Burmese coat colour

About the Colour

A mutation in the Colour gene (Tyrosinase, TYR) causes temperature sensitive pigment production. The wild-type allele (C) is dominant and produces full colouration.

Two copies of the Burmese allele (cb) are required for Burmese colouration and cause a change from black to sepia and orange to yellow, with the points being darker than the body.

Bengal and Savannah cats - our domestic cat Burmese colour genetic test has also been validated in Bengal and Savannah cats (i.e. it will detect Asian Leopard Cat or Serval genes if they are present).

Interpretation of results

Test Result Interpretation
Burmese colouration (cb/cb) Has two copies of the Burmese colouration allele (cb/cb)
Cat will have Burmese colouration
Carrier of Burmese colouration (C/cb) Has one copy of the Burmese colouration allele (C/cb)
Cat will have solid colouration
Does not carry Burmese colouration (C/C) Has no copies of the Burmese colouration allele (C/C)
Cat will have solid colouration

 

Mink Colour

Mink colouration is intermediate between Siamese and Burmese and is caused by the presence of one Siamese allele (cs) and one Burmese allele (cb). If you wish to test for Mink please select both the Siamese and Burmese colouration tests.

 

FAQs

How do I test for Snow colour in my Bengals?

There are 3 kinds of Snow Bengal - Lynx, Sepia and Mink.

Snow Lynx is caused by the Siamese colourpoint mutation

Snow Sepia is caused by the Burmese colour mutation

Snow Mink is caused by a combination of Siamese and Burmese mutations.

Hence, to check the kind of Snow Bengal you have you need to request Siamese and Burmese colour tests.

 

Further information

View and print 'Genetic tests for cats: what the practitioner needs to know' from our Feline Update Archive

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